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posted by Will Weatherly Mar 22,2017 @ 02:16PM

Think Slow

I own a copy of a New York Times Bestseller by a Winner Of The Nobel Prize in Economics (sounds impressive, huh?). “It’s fantastic!” That’s what all the reviews and podcasters say. I wouldn’t know yet. It’s been on my desk and my “next” list for a while now.

Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

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The title alone got me to buy it, because it is the idea of fast-vs-slow thinking that’s been on my mind when it comes to making great marketing.

See, in a few weeks, a team of us from Riggs will be visiting the DIGSOUTH conference in Charleston. The digital wave is advancing our field faster than ever, and change is the status quo. Waves are scary, but they're also exhilerating. We’re pumped. 

Looking over the conference topics, it hits me just how much is happening all around us right now:

  • Virtual Reality
  • Augmented Reality
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Predictive Data Analytics
  • Internet of Things
  • Geo-Mobile
  • 24/7 Live Steaming
  • Digital Automation

 And all of this forces a lot of fast twitch thinking for marketers:

  • What’s new?
  • What’s now?
  • What’s next?
  • Do this?
  • Do that?
  • Click.
  • Post.
  • Share.
  • Like.

Confession? It can get a bit frenetic and pretty overwhelming.

Now, alongside all this, the very same week DIGSOUTH is tackling all that’s new and next, there’s another event going on in Atlanta. It’s a customer experience (“CX”) journey mapping workshop by Strativity’s Journey Management Academy.

If “journey mapping” isn’t on your radar yet, that’s okay. CX is still an emerging though rapidly growing field. Here’s a definition from Harvard Business Review:

“A customer journey map is a very simple idea: a diagram that illustrates the steps your customer(s) go through in engaging with your company, whether it be a product, an online experience, retail experience, or a service, or any combination.” - https://hbr.org/2010/11/using-customer-journey-maps-to

In essence, journey mapping is taking inventory. In our omnichannel world, it’s becoming all the more relevant. This process of auditing every customer touchpoint can take days; require input from all corners of an organization; and involve hundreds if not thousands of Post-it notes.

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It’s slow. It’s methodical. It’s disciplined. It’s full and deep and complex.

Sound painful? Consider this...

Digital innovation is rapidly increasing the number of customer touchpoints. This exponentially increases the need for strong, creatively differentiating brand experiences. There’s never been a greater need for marketers to slow down before going fast. To get clarity before getting creative. 

The best fast thinking is built on a foundation of slow thinking.

So, have you set aside time and resources for slow thinking? Your business' trajectory, your company culture, and your brand marketing – they all depend on it. And there's no time to wait.  

 

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