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posted by Will Weatherly Feb 27,2014 @ 04:20AM

Two Key Marketing Lessons From Architecture School

I didn't go to school for this. At least, it wasn’t my degree. But as my professional studies and experience in marketing have expanded, I've realized my time at the Clemson School of Architecture was far from wasted.

Two particular strategic approaches instilled there carried over beautifully:

1) Flip it upside down.

In Architecture, that literally meant pick up the volumetric shape you’ve been crafting, invert it and set it back down - wrong side up. Then, try to learn something you hadn't noticed before.

In Marketing, it means second-guess your assumptions. So your consumer definitely wants X and always needs Y? Periodically lay that certainty aside. First find, then look and think from, the polar opposite viewpoint. Buyer? Become a seller. Passionate? Role-play apathy. You may be surprised what insights you're missing.

2) Every touchpoint is an opportunity.

In Architecture, on presentation days, professors would provocatively tear off portions of student work and sling them to the floor. "Irrelevant," they'd mutter. This meant your overarching concept needed to more distinctly affect that element. Otherwise, it probably needed to be eliminated completely.

In Marketing, your brand is only as strong as you push it. Inventory your web of external communications (don’t worry, everyone else’s is just as tangled), and rethink elements that don't jive with your organization’s driving attributes. Bear in mind, it's rarely just your print ads and Christmas cards that need a fresh look. Your automated service reply emails, staff LinkedIn pages, and office lobby count too.

Once you’re finished and feeling really certain about things, flip it sideways.

Architectural Model

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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posted by Ryon Edwards Feb 25,2014 @ 04:02PM

Inspiration Everywhere

While waiting in the examination room at my eye doctor, I noticed the archetypal medical poster on the wall depicting normal and abnormal conditions of the eye, complete with cutaway illustrations of eyeballs and eyeball parts, with precise labeling and detailed information. This observation inspired me to create my own poster — but for type-geeks and non-type-geeks alike. - RE

posted by Kevin Archie Feb 11,2014 @ 03:30AM

Too Easy

A few weeks ago, acclaimed website builder Squarespace released a new tool that enables users to create a hi-res mark for their company by combining an icon from a large online library with open-source typography of their choosing for $10. The problem? They called it Squarespace Logo, a grave misnomer in my opinion.

Thoughtful logo design is so much more than just choosing a ready-made icon and pairing it with a trendy free font. It is the process of giving a company an identifiable face that cohesively links it to its brand. This requires intensive research, exploration, refinement, and a close working relationship between designer and client in order to uncover a truly successful mark.

A logo should be recognizable, unique, timeless, versatile, and properly in tune with the brand it represents. It utilizes appropriate color palettes, distinctive visual styles, and relevant typography to tell a compelling and cohesive story. Properly executed, a logo can help bring a company great success and recognition for years to come.

Does Squarespace Logo allow for the creation of an attractive company mark for cheap? Perhaps — but that mark won't have the punch and originality of a professionally designed logo.

I'm not condemning the tool itself. In fact, I encourage you to try it out for the header of your daily Tumblr about what you had for lunch the other day or use it for your grandmother's Hawaiian-themed 85th birthday party invitation.

After all, it's basically logo design at its core. But remember, it takes more than basic to truly define a brand.

posted by Ryon Edwards Dec 11,2013 @ 01:02PM

Riggs Partners’ work published in Print magazine

We're pleased to have work selected for Print magazine's 2013 Regional Design Annual. The annual is the only comprehensive survey of outstanding design throughout the United States. Now in its 32nd year, Print’s Regional Design Annual is seen by tens of thousands of creative professionals, among the largest such audience in the country.

The work featured is the 2011 Annual Report for Palmetto GBA, a subsidiary of BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina. Palmetto GBA provides technical, administrative and contact center services to the federal government (Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services). The book has a blind embossed short cover, colorful infographics and custom die cuts and illustrations for the fold-out case studies.

posted by Apprentices Oct 01,2013 @ 07:03AM

New Work: Doing Pro Bono, Pro Bono

Inspired by the American Bar Association's Celebration of Pro Bono, our friends at Taproot Foundation wanted to create a global celebration of pro bono, skills-based service across all professions. They chose last year's Global Pro Bono Summit as the birthplace for their movement. As business leaders gathered to discuss the increasing viability of the pro bono ethic across industries, Taproot rallied the troops. Summit attendees were quick to demonstrate their enthusiasm, and in that moment, Taproot's idea became a worldwide movement.

As lovers of all things pro bono, we were thrilled when the folks at Taproot asked us to develop Pro Bono Week's brand identity. Ryon Edwards and Nate Puza collaborated on a design that captures the essence of the movement: Proud. Spirited. Visionary. The energetic yellow-orange reflects the contagious positivity of that moment last year when Taproot first unveiled their ambitious plan, and the flag bearer dares every participant to think big. Pro bono is no longer a nicety. From now on, it's serious business.

 

 

 

 

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