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posted by Kevin Smith Apr 22,2015 @ 10:39AM

Trying to Keep Up

Riggs_suitEarlier this month, Media Post published an interesting article about how as we age, the brain moves to the right. Specifically, the brain perceives reality in sensory images and like metaphors. I was excited to be informed that: “Stories generally do a better job of emotionally engaging Baby Boomer minds. In fact, Baby Boomers are more likely than younger consumers to ignore a message that simply describes a product with little or no affect.”

Shortly thereafter, I read in Marketing News: “Digital Disruption and the Death of Storytelling.” Douglas Rushkoff’s views are profound. He reminds us that digital devices leave us living in a reactionary mode, failing to plan for the future or live fully in the present. The multitude of communication channels has rendered even the most centered among us compulsive and compromised.

These two interesting and compelling viewpoints remind me of how confusing the deluge of information we receive can be. In this new age of information, we want absolutes, new rules and decrees we can employ.

It’s simply not that simple. The only thing we can truly be expert at is asking questions of our customers. The modern marketing tumult has made listening the most important art of all. Marketing has no templates because consumers are custom made. Informing an audience to make wise decisions requires an expert tailor with a penchant for hearing others’ truths.

posted by Apprentices Apr 16,2015 @ 08:22AM

Inbound Is For Everyone (Even Realtors)

I recently watched a webinar by Inman, a real estate news website, about the power of inbound marketing

Being the daughter and girlfriend of real estate agents, and having an extreme passion for inbound marketing, I knew this was the webinar for me.

This was a great refresher for me and I think the information given can definitely apply to everyone, even realtors.

Here are my key takeaways from The Art Of Inbound Marketing For Real Estate: 6 Steps For Turning Strangers Into Clients

 I hope you enjoyed this as much as I did!

:) Mary Cate Duffy

posted by Apprentices Apr 15,2015 @ 01:08PM

Raising the Bar

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Columbia is changing and only for the better.

New buildings are going up at a seemingly rapid pace while old ones that have sat vacant for decades are being repurposed for new and exciting things. Notable examples include the former Bull Street Asylum, the Adluh Flour building, and the Palmetto Compress building.

But what of the creative scene? Well that's booming as well. With Indie Grits, ConvergeSE, and POSSCON (The Palmetto Open Source Software Conference) all happening in the same week, Columbia's future certainly looks bright. These three events, along with many others not mentioned here, are uniquely tied to our city and represent a new community of creatives willing to raise the bar for a better Columbia. If this trend continues to grow, we could be looking at the new SXSW within several years.

We look forward to seeing what new creative possibilities arise in our city as it continues to grow taller and wider every day.

What other exciting things are happening around Columbia that we missed?

-Marcus

posted by Michael Powelson Apr 08,2015 @ 11:20AM

"Intimate Exchanges": New work and the possibilities of Point of View

Our Cups Runneth Over 

Everyone loves secrets. And as a creative director, it’s always a treat to realize your client is holding on to one of the “best kept” variety.

In the case of Goodwill of the Upstate & Midlands, that little known fact was the extraordinary lengths the organization stretches to squeeze every last drop of value from a second-hand donation. We’re talking extreme thrift and re-imagining of materials — an “everything-can-be-used-for-something” mentality that would make the earliest inhabitants of this continent nod in solemn approval[1]. Bottom line: if you think that junk in your basement is worth just as much at the dump as anywhere else, you’re wrong. And a 20-minute tour of Goodwill’s distribution center in Greenville will prove it.

So raise your hand if you’ve ever considered taking a 20 minute tour of Goodwill’s distribution center in Greenville.

Siri? Siri is that you? Please say something so I know in which direction to speak…the multitude of hands…they blind me so.

Yeah, it’s just not something people do.

What people do is watch videos on the internet. Even some that don’t have kittens or naked people in them. So we decided this might be a decent way to tell the story of Goodwill’s obsessive point of difference.

But a virtual tour? Come on. We’re not hocking timeshares here[2]. Besides, a 50 mm lens just isn’t going to do justice to the massive operation and rigorous protocols that break donations down to fetch the most a market will bear. What we needed was a unique, amusing way to demonstrate how Goodwill gets more out of things than anyone else. What we needed was a different point of view.

Ever wonder if your old stuff has thoughts? Anxieties? Even, gasp, desires? Sure, it’s ridiculous. But so are human beings. Just ask John Lasseter, who turned the notion into a feature franchise and 2 billion dollars worth of ridiculousness for Pixar.

Point is, when we took our own tour of the Distribution Center, we couldn’t help but be distracted by the true menagerie of donated items. It was fun to realize that each one had recently left its home with a back story, a sense of character, and, given a little imagination, a point of view. We saw such unlikely pairings of items sitting side by side, waiting to be sorted out. What in the world would their conversations be like as they made their way through this Ellis Island of material goods? And could those conversations be an unexpected ticket to telling the larger brand story?

Given a few of the more colorful things we saw, we think they might have played out something like this:  

 

 

 

 

P.S.P.S (Pleasant Surprise Post Script): This work was recently featured on the international industry site "Best Ads On TV," an accomplishment made even more special given that the videos will never, in fact, be seen on TV.


[1] Not something there's been a lot of cause for in the last 500 years.
[2] That is unless you own some. Who doesn't love time? And the sharing! Call us.  

posted by Apprentices Apr 06,2015 @ 09:02PM

Placement and Timing Are Everything in Social Media

by Courtney Fleming
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It can be challenging to produce high-quality content consistently and publish it at the right times. Here at Riggs Partners, we believe in finding which audiences are viewing what content and at what times. This ensures our clients’ content is being published at the most optimal times for reach and engagement.

Our digital marketing specialists use a war chest of social media management tools, SproutSocial being the latest and greatest for scheduling posts and monitoring live engagement.

The beauty of SproutSocial is all in the queue. When scheduling content, we place it into a publishing queue, which in turn delivers the post on all social networks that the brand or business maintains a presence. We adjust the settings based on personal preferences and industry best practices. This includes number of posts per day, time of day, or whether or not to include weekends (yes, you should!).

ViralPost is a new feature on SproutSocial that allows us to determine the most optimal times to deliver content for maximum impact. SproutSocial, through this unique feature, analyzes our audience to chose the optimal time based on engagement and interaction patterns. SproutSocial then publishes the content at the moment it will have the greatest impact for the brand or business.

It would be so easy to just throw content out on all networks, but it’s our job to think strategically about what’s best for our clients and their audience’s needs.

 

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