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posted by Cathy Monetti Aug 18,2016 @ 04:56PM

Change, Nuance and Finding the Sweet Spot

A not-so-secret to success in business is the willingness to evolve. It’s been true from the beginning of time, I suspect, and I am quite sure the requirement has never been more significant than it is in the dynamic world market of today.

I believe so strongly, in fact, change has been a fundamental of our company since its founding nearly 30 years ago. It’s a practice we go about proactively—so much so that a joke around RP is how nice it would be to come in FOR JUST ONE DAY and not feel as if we were starting over.

 Oh, I am proud of that challenge.

 

AND SO IT IS that we’ve spent the summer talking through some newly articulated tenets for our work. I don’t have to tell you of the sea change brand marketing has experienced in the last few years; the digital revolution has not only supported the power shift, it created it. But there are subtle shifts, as well, tiny nuanced considerations that can mean the difference between well considered and invisible.

For example, it’s no surprise a well-designed brand/customer connecting point is the result of smart strategic planning. And yet it’s tempting to issue these like buckshot. There are so many options available to us today, what with endless delivery channels and proclaimed thought leadership and the prevailing belief the world waits (with bated breath) for whatever it is we have to say/sell/do.

But there is a sweet a spot.

Oh, there is a sweet spot and I encourage you to carefully articulate it. Work hard to identify the right time/place/exchange that will create a true brand loyalist—someone who will choose your brand over any other option and, more importantly, will tell others about it.

78272483_thumbnail-749515-edited.jpgA FEW WEEKS AGO we were having this very tenet discussion as we sat around the big kitchen table at the WECO. The question presented to all the Riggers was this: Give an example of a time you were converted to a brand loyalist. What was the brand touchpoint? How did it make you feel? What can we learn from it, and how can it make our work better?

I kicked off the conversation with my own story from the US Open tennis tournament. Sponsored in part by Lexus, VIP parking was available at Flushing Meadows to anyone who arrived in a Lexus or who presented a Lexus key. We zipped past the long, long line of cars waiting to fork over twenty bucks for general parking (on the outskirts of the gigantic tennis complex) and were ushered right in to a sweet spot (pun intended) near the stadium. And it was free.

The message: We, at Lexus, take care of our drivers.

Why it worked: a meaningful benefit ($20 and a great parking space) offered at the perfect time (a premiere event)

But there was also this important nuance: It was on brand for Lexus (luxury brand = VIP)

The conversation that afternoon was fascinating. The stories of brand loyalty were as diverse as our group, although many were of great customer service—a great reminder that even in this day of digital communciations, human exchanges still trump all.

 

WHAT ABOUT YOU? Can you remember a time a brand did something that converted you into a loyalist? 

I’d love to hear the story and share it with our team. Comment below, or send me a note to cathy@riggpartners.com.

posted by Julie Turner Aug 10,2016 @ 03:24PM

Hashtags, the big global event and you.

Let’s be frank for a minute. You can’t get away from hashtags any more and you’ll never be able to again. Whether you’re a lover or hater, hashtags are an integral — and helpful — aspect of the digital landscape.

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With the World Sporting Event That Cannot Legally Be Named without Paying for It upon us, there are several interesting subplots happening in the hashtag world. Let’s look behind the scenes of two social stories currently being battled out.

Twitter vs. U.S. College Football Fans
If you’re going to cheer on a team, say Great Britain, Twitter wanted to be sure you had a tweet-worthy hashtag. That’s why they reallocated the University of Nebraska’s longstanding Go Big Red hashtag (#GBR) and triggered the addition of a British flag to it (creating a temporary #hashflag). Seems easy enough, right?

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Turns out Nebraska fans don’t like it one bit. While the school doesn’t own the hashtag — since you can’t own a hashtag (more on that in a minute) — they’ve been using it for many years. Equally peeved are Purdue University, Eastern Carolina and even SEC stalwarts the University of Georgia Bulldogs. With football season fast approaching, expect #UGA tweets to sport a Ugandan flag for the duration of the Big Sportsing Thing.

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United States Olympic Committee vs. Nonsponsor Marketers
Remember how I said you couldn’t own a hashtag? Apparently you can trademark them as the Committee has pretty effectively done. To prevent ambush marketing, the USOC “advised” brands against marketing that referred to “Olympic results, shares or re-tweets of the official Olympic account, or use of official hashtags including #Rio2016 and #TeamUSA.”

Don’t worry, they’re not going to come after us Everyday Joes — individuals who tag their #phelpsface memes with official hashtags. In fact, the way some brands skirt around the mention is getting them some serious tweetplay.

So what does all of this hashtag fluttery mean for a modern marketer who doesn’t have Super Big World Game aspirations?

Hashtags are here to stay. Not the ones #youandyourfriendsjustmakeup. Real hashtags that integrate varied marketing strategies to multiple audiences in platforms ranging from Instagram to Facebook. Hashtags are indexed by social networks and searchable by anyone. That’s staying power you can harness for free.

However, if your hashtag has grown into a valued brand asset, you now have some means to protect it. You can invest in trademark protection for a hashtag via the United States Patent and Trademark Office. At a cost of about $275 and six months, you can register a trademark though you may experience bumps in the road based on the hashtag content.

In short, hashtags are here to stay. If you’re finally ready to wade in, tread very, very carefully.

posted by Teresa Coles Aug 01,2016 @ 03:03PM

Believable Brands Believe in Something

Your business is doing just fine. Profits are more or less steady. Customers appear to be satisfied. Employees are not complaining, at least openly. Sales and marketing teams have all the busy work they need.

You’re holding steady. Or are you?

If this sounds like your organization, the unfortunate reality is that you’re losing ground every day. What may appear to be a healthy status quo is nothing more than a cry for movement out of the ordinary, into a space that is ripe with meaning and impact for all parties involved. One where success is fueled by a brand strategy and product/service experience that is a complete and uncompromised reflection of your company’s belief system.

Call it Corporate Culture. Organizational Health. Understanding Your Why. What matters most is that your company or organization must have a point of view that sets you apart externally and inspires you internally. To effectively harness this strategy is to connect your company’s belief system — what it stands for — to a brand that is imminently believable in the marketplace.

Evidence is mounting every day to support the importance of building purpose-driven organizations and brands, and it starts from the inside. Consider the prevailing mindset of today’s employees as it relates to understanding what their companies are all about, beyond their day-to-day job functions:

  • 56% say their company’s purpose is not clearly conveyed to all employees
  • 68% don’t think businesses do enough to instill a sense of meaningful purpose in their work culture
  • 81% consider a company’s corporate social responsibility practices when deciding where to work

On the flip side, data indicates that employees are much more likely to be engaged with a company, act as brand advocates and stay longer with a company that openly and consistently leads with a strong sense of purpose. When team members cultivate a shared belief system, the odds of accomplishing more meaningful and productive work grows exponentially.

The profile among consumers as it relates to a company’s purpose is equally compelling: 

  • 71% would help a brand promote their product or services if there is a good cause behind them
  • 91% of consumers would switch brands if a different brand of similar price and quality supported a good cause
  • 90% would boycott if they learned of a company’s irresponsible business practices; 55% have done so in the past 12 months

Like employees, the connectivity and control that exists among consumers gives them a front-row seat to the character and practices of an organization. Given their finger is on the proverbial button of influence, it’s easy to see the strategic advantage of building connections between consumers and brands that stand for something larger that the specific product or service. This kind of goodwill is pivotal in helping brands withstand the temporary setbacks that may result from issues associated with product or service dissatisfaction.

Where and how does purpose show up in brand marketing? Take a look around, and it’s easy to see leading brands that are calling both internal and external audiences to arms through shared beliefs.

Of note is the #LikeAGirl campaign from Always, which debuted in 2014. As a company whose purpose is to empower and instill confidence in pubescent girls, the Always brand created a movement designed to keep girls in sports, noting that 50% typically drop out at the onset of puberty due to a plummet in their confidence. The brand dispelled the myths associated with “like a girl,” turning the language on its side to reflect the spirit, skill and confidence that exists in young female athletes.
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Calling on your company’s belief system as a strategic differentiator is by no means a soft or nice-to-do strategy reserved for the Fortune 500 set. Leading a company through a shared sense of purpose can benefit organizations of any size, from improved team dynamics and accelerated product innovation to market-altering customer service experiences. Align this kind of inspired performance with an external brand that reflects the ideals of your company, and you’ll find yourself with customers who are ready to believe in you. That’s a one-way ticket out of the status quo.

*This article originally appeared in the July 18-August 16 issue of Columbia Regional Business Report.

 Sources:
Edelman GoodPurpose Study
Havas Media “Meaningful Brands” Global Report
Deloitte Core Beliefs and Culture Survey
Cone Communications/Echo Global CSR Study

posted by Will Weatherly Jul 21,2016 @ 12:51PM

Businesses Are Just People Too

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For nearly a year, social media mogul and notorious speaker Gary Vaynerchuk has been honing a message. Infamous in marketing circles for his long history of brash, profane, egotistical-at-first-listen presentations near the cross streets of culture and marketing, Gary’s newest barb is as pointed as always. But now, alongside the release of his new book, he’s jabbing it at individuals not industries.

His point?


Self-awareness.

In his words…

 

“There is something that is rarely talked about in the business world and I want to start building more attention for it.
 
That thing is self-awareness…
 
… Self-awareness allows people to recognize what things they do best so they can then go hard on those aspects of their life. It also helps you accept your weaknesses.What works for one person doesn’t work for everyone. I want people to learn to be at peace with themselves, to understand what they can offer, because everyone’s got something. The key, however, is learning how to find it.
 
Self-awareness can help you do that.
 
Self-awareness is being able to accept your weaknesses while focusing all of your attention on your strengths. The moment you decide to accept your shortcomings and bet entirely on your strengths, things will change. Trust me.”

 

Now, with this idea, Gary openly aims to poke holes in the mythology of entrepreneurism that’s being inflated by the business community, its incubators, accelerators, and startup weekends.

But that’s not what’s interesting to me.

 

What’s interesting are the implications for business.

See, I’ve come to believe businesses are just people too.

Businesses have life in them. When they’re young, they need nourishment and protection to grow. They need relationships with people that love them, who are willing to buy. They need unique parts of themselves to get along with each other, teams to keep things functioning and life flowing. These are all essential to survival.

But what if a business wants to do more than survive?

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What if a business wants to achieve as much as possible? To contribute something incredible to the world, something special, something unique, something only that business has the physical and conscious makeup to create?

 

What might it take to self-actualize such a thing?

Maybe first, it would take esteem.

Maybe first, it would take self-awareness.

The concrete, confident knowlege of what that business does best. To have crystal clarity on its strengths. To embrace its flaws and own its weaknesses. To see vividly into its blind spots. To regularly reflect inward. To understand when, where, and why its elements are not aligned.

If that’s what it took, how might a business get such self-awareness?

Dig around “GaryVee” long enough and you’ll find his best piece of advice for people is to… ask.

So, maybe that's good advice for business too. 

 

Ask who?

Ask the people who love you. 

Ask every part of yourself. 

Ask some strangers.

Triangulate.

 

 

posted by Kevin Smith Jul 14,2016 @ 04:09PM

Loving Your Work

Our annual 24-hour pro bono marketing marathon, CreateAthon, is in the works again. We are receiving applications now for our nineteenth CreateAthon. While skills-based volunteerism existed fifteen years ago, it has been heartening to see it evolve from a concept embraced mostly by lawyers into a national business movement.

Part of that momentum is being driven by A Billion + Change, an organization leading efforts to expand the number of companies committed to skills-based and pro bono service. To date, they have engaged more than 5,000 companies of every size, industry and geography to donate over five billion dollars worth of services. The vision of A Billion + Change is to transform business culture so that all companies in America will respond to the needs of their communities.

The benefits of skills-based volunteerism are many: building morale, improving community relations and fostering leadership skills. Every year, I’m amazed at how staying up all night actually reenergizes our company. (After a recovery weekend, of course.) In fact, when I consider all that CreateAthon has meant to our business, it is difficult to imagine why one wouldn’t lend their skills to a cause. Yet I understand the excuses. “We’re too small.” “We don’t have time.” “What we do doesn’t translate well to volunteerism.”

I thought of these excuses, and how each one applied to “Get Fit for Good,” an effort by Matt Potts, a college student and trainer at Fit Columbia. “Get Fit for Good” is a pay what you want, twice-weekly workout class with proceeds benefiting Innersole, a charity providing athletic shoes to children who are homeless or in need. It’s one guy spending an hour a week doing what he loves, helping people get fit, all the while raising money for kids. Matt reminds me that many times excuses are just that, and you can usually find a way to make pro bono work.

Most companies have charitable programs in place. From blood drives to fundraising and corporate giving, it’s always meaningful to give back. But there is a unique satisfaction in knowing that the skills that provide for your family can provide for someone in need as well. It reminds you of what drew you to your field, and provides a renewed sense of energy and purpose to the work at hand. If you love what you do, figure out how to give it away ­– for good.

 

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By the numbers

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